Mira Schneiders joined the Ethox Centre in October 2016 as a DPhil candidate under the supervision of Professor Mike Parker and Associate Professor Maureen Kelley. Mira’s work evolves around the ethics of healthy ageing and long-term care in low-resource settings.

Image - Care In TransitionPopulations around the world are living longer and ageing much more rapidly than ever before. This trend particularly affects low- and middle-income countries, where 80% of people aged 60 years and over are expected to be living by 2050. While people all around the world are living longer, these extra years of life are largely not being spent in better health, resulting in extended periods of morbidity and increasing demands on health and long-term care. Health in older age also follows a clear socio-economic gradient, resulting in large inequities that call to be addressed in light of unprecedented population ageing.

While bioethics has long concerned itself with issues raised by end-of-life decisions, the ethical issues arising for long-term care in low-resource settings as a result of extended longevity and morbidity have been inadequately attended to. In her research, Mira is interested in exploring the roles and responsibilities of family caregivers, as well as other stakeholders, including governments, civil society and the private sector in providing long-term care for older people with dementia in low-resource settings. Of particular interest to her are the ethical challenges faced by family caregivers, such as the everyday trade-offs that caregivers have to make to meet the rising demands for care, the role of caregiver support interventions in addressing these tensions, as well as broader questions around a just distribution of long-term care responsibilities.